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Politics on the Wall

Posted on Jan 17, 2009 | 4 comments

This shot, taken on the via Nomentana shows the signage for two opposing political parties. These types of signs are commonly found around the city. In fact, after Obama won the elections, the Partita Democratica posted hundreds of signs with his image on it, touting a time for change in Italy as well (the Partita Democratica is the left wing here, with the right wing party of Berlusconi currently in power).

So what do they say? The sign on the left is from the Partita Democratica, speaking on the situation in Gaza. It reads “Middle East. Don’t resign yourself to war. Stop with your weapons. Construct peace through dialog.” The one of the right is from the Popolo della Liberta’, the right wing party of current Rome mayor Gianni Alemanno. This party is also the party of Berlusconi. For those of you who have only recently heard of Berlusconi due to his ridiculous comments about Barack Obama, just read his bio to see that is only the tip of the iceberg. I’ll tell you now that I’m no fan of his or Alemanno’s, but in the effort of time, I’ll just translate the poster, which is advertising a rally. It reads “The future of identity. The right wing values of the Popolo della Liberta’. Sunday, January 18 at 10 am. Cinema Adriano. Alemanno.” If you haven’t already, read my Italy and Immigration post. I have a feeling this might be the type of “identity” they’re talking about unfortunately.

In other news, today there was a protest against the bombing going on in Gaza. The La Repubblica has some very striking images of the protest, which was organized by some of the left wing parties and was attended about 100,000 people from across Italy.

4 Comments

  1. Interesting about the protest. I passed a protest march against the bombing of Gaza here in Minneapolis on the way back from a gallery, grocery shopping, and photo shoot (I like to combine things). Italy is such an expressive place. How many parties do they have nowadays?

  2. This online image database (http://www.manifestipolitici.it/)might be of interest to you and your readers – it contains political posters throughout the decades, and it’s interesting to see how Italy’s political parties have changed over the years.

  3. Keith – Thanks for the link! I tweeted it as well. I really like vintage posters, so I’m going to have fun browsing around.

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